The Effect of Trypanosoma Rhodesiense On Temperatures of Sheep

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Date
1952
Authors
Burtt E.
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Abstract
I have given (1950) an account of factors which may influence body temperature in warm-blooded animals. In the majority this does not remain quite constant throughout the 24 hours: it rises somewhat during the day, because heat is not lost as rapidly as it is generated or acquired from the environment. In heall'hy individuals this superfluous heat is lost during the night and the body temperature drops to a level which is characteristic for the individual, race, or species concerned. In the same species the level of stability of temperature may vary with season, or with the part of the world in which the animal is living. Average figures have to be based on the study of many individuals and as large a number of observations as possible. Overcrowding at night may impede heat loss, in which case the body temperature in the early morning may still be considerably higher than is normal for the species concerned.
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East African Agricultural And Forestry Journal, XVIII (1), p. 35-38
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