Control of Fusarium Wilt of Tomatoes Using Soil Amendments

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Date
1995
Authors
Waudo, S. W.
Owino, P. O.
Kuria, M.
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Abstract
Fusarium wilt of tomatoes caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Sacc) Snyd and Hans was first described in Channel Islands (Walker, 1950). Today the disease is widely distributed in warm regions of the world. The first symptoms of the disease are clearing of veinlet of young leaves and epinasty (Foster, 1946). At its advanced stage plants become chlorotic (particularly lower leaves), wilt and defoliate prematurely. 1n addition, there are rotting of feeder roots, leaf marginal necrosis, generally poorly developed root system, occasional formation of adventitious roots, browning of the vascular system and rotting and dropping off of leaves without becoming spotted (David and Diamond, 1954; Winstead and Walker, 1954; Waggoner and Diamond, 1955). Most of the symptoms appear on one side of the stem and progress upward until the plant dies (Agrios. 1978).
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East African Agricultural and Forestry Journal, 60 (4), pp. 235-245
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