Epidemiology of Theileria Parva Theileriosis in the Southern Province of Zambia

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Date
1999
Authors
Mulumba, M.
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Misheck Mulumba
Abstract
Theileriosis is the most important livestock tick-borne infection in Africa (Perry and Young, 1995) affecting 14 countries in eastern, central and southern Africa (Figure 1.1). The most important of the Theileria infections are those caused by Theileria parva responsible for the disease entity called East Coast fever (ECF). The distribution of ECF closely mirrors that of its main field vectors Rhipicephalus appendiculatus and Rhipicephalus zambeziensis. Other important forms of T. parva infections identified include Corridor disease (Neitz, 1955), which is caused by buffalo-derived T. parva and causes significant problems in cattle populations associated with the African buffalo (Syncerus caffea) in southern Africa and January disease caused by a mild form of T. parva. Corridor disease differs from ECF in that the number of piroplasms is low and there are hardly any schizonts seen and the disease ceases once the cattle are moved away from buffalo inhabited areas.
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