The Use of Vegetable Oils and Ash In The Protection of Cowpea Seeds (Vigna Unguiculata (L) Walp.) Against Callosobruchus Maculatus (F) (Colleoptera: Bruchidae)

No Thumbnail Available
Date
1968
Authors
Apuuli, J.K.K.
Mueke, J.M.
Journal Title
Journal ISSN
Volume Title
Publisher
Abstract
In many parts of Africa, particularly West and East African countries, cowpea beans are an important source of dietary proteins (Howe and Currie, 1964). Cowpea as a dry pulse excels in nuitritive characteristics with crude protein level that can exceed 30 percent but averages 23.4 percent (Anon 1974, and Purseglove, 1968). There are no reports of antimetabolic factors or toxic components in cowpeas (Anon, 1974). The pulses playa very vital role in relieving protein malnutrition in many areas where animal protein cannot be afforded. Cowpea leaves also contain the following vitamins: thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, pyridoxine, pentothemic acid, biotic and folic acid (Ogunmodete and Oyenuga, 1970).
Description
Keywords
Citation
East African Agricultural And Forestry Journal, LII (2), p. 101-105
Collections