Underground Storage of Maize in Tanganyika

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Date
1954
Authors
Swaine, G.
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Abstract
Underground storage of food grains on a commercial scale is now carried out in the Argentine, Turtle [1] and Oxley [2]. The principles worked out in the Argentine are that infested grain, of less than 13 per cent moisture content, is sealed down in an underground pit which allows neither entry nor exit of water vapour, nor exit of carbon dioxide produced by the infesting insects. Under these conditions there is an accumulation of respiratory carbon dioxide in the inter-granular air which causes the death of the insects contained in the pit. Recent work in Australia and England has shown that the concentration of carbon dioxide required to exterminate the infestation is directly related to the intergranular oxygen concentration.
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East African Agricultural And Forestry Journal, 20 (2), p. 122-128
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