Sprouted Grain as a Stock Food

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Date
1937
Authors
Ball,R.S
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Abstract
Sprouted grain as a stock food has become increasingly popular in Europe during the last few years since it provides a succulent and very palatable feed which can be used safely for any class of stock. Experiments have been carried out in this country and it has proved to be very easy to prepare, since the relatively high temperatures generally experienced make it unnecessary to use any artificial heat in the sprouting of the grain and very little equipment is required. An additional advantage of this food is the rapidity with which it can be prepared should other sources of feed supplies fail unexpectedly or supplies of succulent material become scarce. On an average, a period of thirteen to seventeen days only is required to prepare the grain, although this time will vary according to the day and night temperatures. The greatest growth is obtained when the temperature can be maintained fairly uniform throughout, which can be most readily achieved by growing the grain in a fairly thick-walled mud and wattle store with a grass roof.
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East African Agricultural And Forestry Journal, III (No 3), p. 180-182
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