Breeding Evaluation of Population Improvement in the Kenya Maize Breeding Methods Study

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Date
1968
Authors
Darrah, L. L.
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Abstract
The maize (Zea mays L.) breeding methods study in Kenya was initiated in 1964 to compare the efficiency of various methods for improving yield. A minimum of ten years of selection was completed in each experiment, and some procedures continue today because of their efficacy in line or population development. Following selection, there were three years of evaluation, including both direct and indirect effects of selection. Intra population improvement was conducted, using three variations of mass selection, including two plant densities and two levels of selection intensity. Five variations of ear-to-row selection included comparison of number of generations of random mating prior to beginning selection, plant density, male plant elimination and number of entries in the selection trial. Other methods compared were half-sib, S 1 and full-sib recurrent selection. The most consistent improvement was found with ear-to-row selection,
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East African Agricultural And Forestry Journal
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