The Contribution of Minerals and Aqueous Carbonate to PH Buffering

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Date
1974
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Kenya Soil Survey
Abstract
Thermodynamic equilibrium considerations are used to calculate pH buffer intensities for a number of aqueous systems involving 16 common soil and rock minerals (viz. gibbsite, kaolinite, allophane, hematite, limonitic iron oxide, quartz, amorphous silica, calcite, siderite, hydrated magnetite +amorphous Fe (OH) 3' microcline, albite, anorthite, Mg·montmorillonite, two illites, and Mg-chlorite), gaseous CO2 and 26 dissolved species. The calculation of buffer intensities is outlined for simple oxides and carbonates (analytical evaluation) and for silicate minerals during congruent and incongruent dissolution (graphical differentiation). Silicate minerals, carbonates and gibbsite provide strong buffering upon addition of strong acid under slightly alkaline to slightly acid conditions. Carbon dioxide at constant partial pressure is far more effective than any of the minerals considered in counteracting the effect of an increase in alkalinity.
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